Musings from Home

Lash Double-Take

One morning not long ago, as I was putting on my mascara, I caught a glimpse of green out of the corner of my eye. I don’t know if it’s the science geek in me, or if it’s a common reaction, but my initial, very quick, response was, “OMG, what am I putting so near my eye? What’s growing in my mascara????” I felt almost sick.

When I pulled the wand away from my eye far enough to actually see it clearly, I discovered that the bristles are green and purple — on purpose. I had two very rapid thoughts pop into my head:

1. I sure am observant! The mascara tube is not new; in fact it’s almost empty and this is the first I have noticed it?! It kinda makes me wonder what else I miss, but that’s for another post.

2. What are the folks at Maybelline thinking? A green mascara wand??? Is this someone’s idea of a fun prank or am I the only person who thinks of things growing when they see green in things known to grow bacteria and such? Of course, I admit to being a science geek and I’ve seen many things growing in petri dishes in my lifetime, so maybe it is just me.

I began to wonder just how common a thing this is. So the next time I wandered through a drug store, I made it a point to look in the makeup aisle at mascara. It just so happens many brands package their mascara with the wand out of the tube and fully visible through the plastic. And you would not believe what I discovered (well, maybe you would): green mascara wands are common and Maybelline is not the only company making them.

Why green? I still can’t imagine. I’m all for color. In fact, I love color, the brighter the better. But does anyone really care about the color of their mascara wand that will usually be covered in brown or black goo? Is there really a purpose behind it? For instance, is it easier to tell how much mascara is on the wand if the color of the wand is not the same as the makeup itself, therefore avoiding “goop eyes”?

It is quite possible that this practice has gone on for years and years and that it really is not a big deal to anyone. I really have no idea.

But if we’re going to have colored mascara wands, why not do something really cool and helpful? Let’s design a wand that changes color to a bright, screaming-out neon when there IS something growing in the makeup.

Oh man, I hope that’s not what they’ve done already . . . [I know some wands start out green, but I do not know for a fact that mine did.]

Do you know what color the bristles on your mascara wand are? Would green bother you or cause you to take a double-take?

[Note: I have not been asked to write about any brands and have not been paid to do so. Duh, why would a company pay me to bash their wand? :)]

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Comments on: "Lash Double-Take" (3)

  1. Okay, this is really funny. I don’t wear mascara, but I own a tube of mascara for that one week I thought I was going to be a makeup person. Well, guess what…it’s green! But it is Covergirl Natureluxe so it has to be green. It’s trying to advertise that the ingredients “come from nature.” But green is green. Go figure.

  2. While I am not smart enough to be a science geek, I was smart enough to marry one. I have not used masacara in decades and don’t wear much makeup anymore but recently I looked into the idea of using a clear mascara product as a conditioning agent for my aging lashes. I am constantly asking DH to peruse food and cosmetic/toiletry labels and asking him only half-joking, “Is this product The Devil?” So he read the label of every clear mascara on Drugstore.com and confirmed that yes, the ingredients were toxic and shouldn’t be applied near the eyes. That being said, I agree with you that mascara wands should be a color other than mold, I was thinking white, but then they would look like kitchen scrubbing brushes, I guess. Hmmm…………..

  3. If I had to guess, it’s a subtle marketing ploy to get you to think that their product is environmentally friendly and human friendly. Green seems to be the color of choice when attempting to spin a company’s reputation.

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